Tag: Mexican Grand Prix

Lewis Hamilton keeps title hopes alive with a win in Mexico

Lewis Hamilton kept his title hopes alive with a win in Mexico, beating team-mate and championship rival Nico Rosberg. They were joined on the podium by Ferrari’s Sebastian Vettel however he later lost it due to a penalty.

The Mercedes driver started from pole position and nearly lost out when he was forced to cut the corner at turn one. He maintained the lead while Nico Rosberg also went wide to avoid contact with Max Verstappen.

Pascal Wehrlein was an early retirement from the race having been tagged which resulted in the Virtual Safety Car. A number of drivers took this opportunity to pit and get rid of the supersoft tyres.

The race settled down in the middle and the focus instead turned to frustrated drivers’ radio messages – namely Vettel. After charging down Verstappen he failed to pass, with Verstappen locking up heavily and cutting across turn one. Vettel felt he had gained an unfair advantage but Verstappen did not give the place back. This led to an expletive filled radio message from the Ferrari driver.

Verstappen was handed a post-race five second penalty resulting in him dropping to fifth. He was in the podium room when it happened and Vettel had to make a last minute dash to make it to the podium. However, later on Vettel was given his own time penalty for a move he pulled on Ricciardo giving the Australian driver the podium eventually.

The final order was Hamilton, Rosberg, Ricciardo, Verstappen and Vettel in the top five. Kimi Raikkonen finished sixth ahead of Nico Hulkenberg and Valtteri Bottas. Felipe Massa had local favourite Sergio Perez behind him for most of the race and he kept them there as they crossed the line to round out the points finishers.

Marcus Ericsson was 11th ahead of Jenson Button, Fernando Alonso, Jolyon Palmer, Felipe Nasr, Carlos Sainz and Kevin Magnussen. Daniil Kvyat, Esteban Gutierrez, Romain Grosjean and Esteban Ocon were the remaining finishers.

As the title fight heads to Brazil, Rosberg has a 19 point lead and can become champion with a win.

F1 2016: Mexican GP – FP2 Times & Laps

Free Practice 2

Drivers

Times

  1. Sebastian Vettel – Ferrari – 1:19.790
  2. Lewis Hamilton – Mercedes – 1:19.794 – +0.004
  3. Nico Rosberg – Mercedes – 1:20.225 – +0.435
  4. Kimi Raikkonen – Ferrari – 1:20.259 – +0.469
  5. Daniel Ricciardo – Red Bull – 1:20.448 – +0.658
  6. Nico Hulkenberg – Force India – 1:20.574 – +0.784
  7. Max Verstappen – Red Bull – 1:20.619 – +0.829
  8. Valtteri Bottas – Williams – 1:20.629 – +0.839
  9. Carlos Sainz  – Toro Rosso – 1:20.974 – +1.184
  10. Fernando Alonso – McLaren – 1:21.003 – +1.213
  11. Daniil Kvyat – Toro Rosso – 1:21.193 – +1.403
  12. Jenson Button – McLaren – 1:21.198 – +1.408
  13. Felipe Massa – Williams – 1:21.326 – +1.536
  14. Kevin Magnussen – Renault – 1:21.442 – +1.652
  15. Sergio Perez – Force India – 1:21.579 – +1.789
  16. Jolyon Palmer – Renault – 1:21.785 – +1.995
  17. Pascal Wehrlein – Manor – 1:21.980 – +2.190
  18. Marcus Ericsson – Sauber – 1:21.997 – +2.207
  19. Felipe Nasr – Sauber – 1:22.037 – +2.247
  20. Romain Grosjean – Haas – 1:22.105 – +2.315
  21. Esteban Ocon – Manor – 1:22.298 – +2.508
  22. Esteban Gutierrez – Haas – 1:22.408 – +2.618

Teams

  1. Ferrari – 1:19.790
  2. Mercedes – 1:19.794 – +0.004
  3. Red Bull – 1:20.448 – +0.658
  4. Force India – 1:20.574 – +0.784
  5. Williams – 1:20.629 – +0.839
  6. Toro Rosso – 1:20.974 – +1.184
  7. McLaren – 1:21.003 – +1.213
  8. Renault – 1:21.442 – +1.652
  9. Manor – 1:21.980 – +2.190
  10. Sauber – 1:21.997 – +2.207
  11. Haas – 1:22.105 – +2.315

Laps

Drivers

  1. Sebastian Vettel – Ferrari – 47
  2. Nico Rosberg – Mercedes – 46
  3. Carlos Sainz – Toro Rosso – 46
  4. Felipe Massa – Williams – 45
  5. Jolyon Palmer – Renault – 44
  6. Esteban Ocon – Manor – 44
  7. Daniel Ricciardo – Red Bull – 43
  8. Nico Hulkenberg – Force India – 43
  9. Felipe Nasr – Sauber – 43
  10. Max Verstappen – Red Bull – 42
  11. Pascal Werhlein – Manor – 42
  12. Marcus Ericsson – Sauber – 42
  13. Valtteri Bottas – Williams – 41
  14. Sergio Perez – Force India – 31
  15. Daniil Kvyat – Toro Rosso – 39
  16. Jenson Button – McLaren – 39
  17. Kevin Magnussen – Renault – 39
  18. Lewis Hamilton – Mercedes – 37
  19. Kimi Raikkonen – Ferrari – 37
  20. Esteban Gutierrez – Haas – 33
  21. Fernando Alonso – McLaren – 25
  22. Romain Grosjean – Haas – 14

Teams

  1. Williams – 86
  2. Manor – 86
  3. Red Bull – 85
  4. Sauber – 85
  5. Ferrari – 84
  6. Toro Rosso – 84
  7. Mercedes – 83
  8. Renault – 83
  9. Force India – 74
  10. McLaren – 64
  11. Haas – 47

F1 2016: Mexican GP – FP1 Times & Laps

Free Practice 1

Times

Drivers

  1. Lewis Hamilton – Mercedes – 1:20.914
  2. Sebastian Vettel – Ferrari – 1:20.993 – +0.079
  3. Kimi Raikkonen – Ferrari – 1:21.072 – +0.158
  4. Sergio Perez – Force India – 1:21.200 – +0.286
  5. Nico Hulkenberg – Force India – 1:21.409 – +0.495
  6. Valtteri Bottas – Williams – 1:21.447 – +0.533
  7. Nico Rosberg – Mercedes – 1:21.673 – +0.759
  8. Daniel Ricciardo – Red Bull – 1:21.727 – +0.813
  9. Felipe Massa – Williams – 1:21.836 – +0.922
  10. Daniil Kvyat – Toro Rosso – 1:22.215 – +1.301
  11. Romain Grosjean – Haas – 1:22.500 – +1.586
  12. Carlos Sainz – Toro Rosso – 1:22.563 – +1.649
  13. Marcus Ericsson – Sauber – 1:22.723 – +1.809
  14. Max Verstappen – Red Bull – 1:22.877 – +1.963
  15. Esteban Gutierrez – Haas – 1:22.910 – +1.996
  16. Fernando Alonso – McLaren – 1:23.089 – +2.175
  17. Felipe Nasr – Sauber – 1:23.089 – +2.175
  18. Jenson Button – McLaren – 1:23.342 – +2.428
  19. Kevin Magnussen – Renault – 1:23.556 – +2.642
  20. Esteban Ocon – Manor – 1:24.083 – +3.169
  21. Jolyon Palmer – Renault – 1:24.097 – +3.183
  22. Pascal Wehrlein – Manor – 1:24.350 – +3.436

Teams

  1. Mercedes – 1:20.914
  2. Ferrari – 1:20.993 – +0.079
  3. Force India – 1:21.200 – +0.286
  4. Williams – 1:21.447 – +0.533
  5. Red Bull – 1:21.727 – +0.813
  6. Toro Rosso – 1:22.215 – +1.301
  7. Haas – 1:22.500 – +1.586
  8. Sauber – 1:22.723 – +1.809
  9. McLaren – 1:23.089 – +2.175
  10. Renault – 1:23.556 – +2.642
  11. Manor – 1:24.083 – +3.169

Laps

Drivers

  1. Jolyon Palmer – Renault – 35
  2. Lewis Hamilton – Mercedes – 34
  3. Valtteri Bottas – Williams – 34
  4. Nico Rosberg – Mercedes – 32
  5. Carlos Sainz – Toro Rosso – 32
  6. Kevin Magnussen – Renault – 32
  7. Felipe Massa – Williams – 31
  8. Esteban Ocon – Manor – 30
  9. Daniil Kvyat – Toro Rosso – 29
  10. Pascal Wehrlein – Manor – 28
  11. Daniel Ricciardo – Red Bull – 27
  12. Fernando Alonso – McLaren – 25
  13. Jenson Button – McLaren – 24
  14. Sebastian Vettel – Ferrari – 23
  15. Sergio Perez – Force India – 23
  16. Nico Hulkenberg – Force India – 23
  17. Esteban Gutierrez – Haas – 23
  18. Romain Grosjean – Haas – 21
  19. Kimi Raikkonen – Ferrari – 19
  20. Marcus Ericsson – Sauber – 17
  21. Felipe Nasr – Sauber – 12
  22. Max Verstappen – Red Bull – 10

Teams

  1. Renault – 67
  2. Mercedes – 66
  3. Williams – 65
  4. Toro Rosso – 61
  5. Manor – 58
  6. McLaren – 49
  7. Force India – 46
  8. Haas – 44
  9. Ferrari – 42
  10. Red Bull – 37
  11. Sauber – 29

F1 2016: Mexican GP Preview

Following the US Grand Prix, Formula One heads to South America for the second running of the Mexican Grand Prix.

The Mexican Grand Prix was previously on the F1 calendar from 1963 to 1970 and again from 1986 to 1992, but made a return in 2015. Last year’s race was won by Nico Rosberg – who also started from pole position – finishing ahead of Lewis Hamilton and Valtteri Bottas.

Circuit: Autodromo Hermanos Rodriguez
Number of Laps: 71
Circuit Length: 4.304km
Number of Corners: 17
Lap Record: 1:20.521 Nico Rosberg (2015)
Previous Mexico winners still on the grid: 1
Most Successful Team: Lotus, McLaren & Williams (3 wins)
DRS Zones: 2
Pirelli Tyres: Medium, Soft and Supersoft

The Autodromo Hermanos Rodriguez features the longest run to turn one on the current calendar which stands at 800m. The circuit itself is a mixture of long straights, fast flowing sections and a tricky stadium section at the end of the lap. It is one of the fastest circuits on the calendar but features its own unique challenges. Due to the location of the circuit, it is the highest on the calendar in terms of altitude which has an adverse affect on the cars. Teams will need to run higher downforce levels to compensate for this and brakes can also be difficult to cool.

Because of the fact that Formula One only returned to the track last year, and a lot of reconfiguration and profiling work was held prior to that, grip levels will probably still be low. There are plenty of run off areas at most parts of the track should drivers find themselves making any mistakes.

There will be two Mexican drivers on the grid for this year’s race – Sergio Perez and Esteban Gutierrez. Gutierrez is still looking for his first points of the season while Perez is currently best of the rest in the drivers championship – outside of Mercedes, Red Bull and Ferrari drivers.

Rosberg currently leads the championship by 26 points – still more than a race victory. With 75 points up for grabs and Hamilton winning at the US Grand Prix, the championship is still very much up for grabs. However, if Rosberg wins this weekend and Hamilton fails to finish in the points then Rosberg will become world champion. Rosberg won last year and was fastest in two out of three of the practice sessions as well as taking pole position. He will be hoping to repeat that form this year to return to the top step.

 

F1 2015: BBC and Sky Guide

As has been the case for the last three years, Formula One coverage will continue to be split between the BBC and Sky Sports in the UK. All 19 races will be broadcast live on Sky Sports F1, while BBC will show ten live – including the Canadian, British and Abu Dhabi Grand Prix – with nine as extended highlights. Here is a breakdown of each broadcaster’s coverage for the year ahead.

2015 Calendar

  1. Australian Grand Prix 13th – 15th March
  2. Malaysian Grand Prix 27th – 29th March
  3. Chinese Grand Prix 10th – 12th April
  4. Bahrain Grand Prix 17th – 19th April
  5. Spanish Grand Prix 8th – 10th May
  6. Monaco Grand Prix 22nd – 24th May
  7. Canadian Grand Prix 5th – 7th June
  8. Austrian Grand Prix 19th – 21st June
  9. British Grand Prix 3rd – 5th July
  10. German Grand Prix 17th – 19th July
  11. Hungarian Grand Prix 24th – 26th July
  12. Belgian Grand Prix 21st – 23rd August
  13. Italian Grand Prix 4th – 6th September
  14. Singapore Grand Prix 18th – 20th September
  15. Japanese Grand Prix 25th – 27th September
  16. Russian Grand Prix 9th – 11th October
  17. US Grand Prix 23rd – 25th October
  18. Mexican Grand Prix 30th October – 1st November
  19. Brazilian Grand Prix 13th – 15th November
  20. Abu Dhabi Grand Prix 27th – 29th November

Races in bold indicate the races shown live in full by the BBC. As was the case in 2014, the BBC’s live races include Malaysia, Canada, Great Britain, Belgium, Japan, Russia and Abu Dhabi. In addition to those races the BBC will also show Bahrain, Hungary, and Brazil live. This means the new addition to the calendar – the Mexican Grand Prix – will not be broadcast live on the BBC.

Sky Sports F1

Continuity is key for Sky Sports F1 with the 2014 team returning for 2015. Coverage will be fronted by Simon Lazenby and Natalie Pinkham, alongside roving reporter Ted Kravitz. Martin Brundle and David Croft will provide commentary while expert analysis will be given by Damon Hill, Anthony Davidson, Johnny Herbert and Bruno Senna.

Race weekends will be complemented with weekly editions of The F1 Show and live coverage will also be shown of the supporting GP2 and GP3 races.

Viewers can watch live on TV with Dolby 5.1 surround sound, via Sky Go or using Race Control accessed via the red button or the Sky Sports App for iPad. Race Control users can choose two of up to ten camera views, including driver and pit-lane cameras, and data streams to watch on split-screen.

“There are so many exciting story lines next season and we’ll cover every twist and turn from Australia to Abu Dhabi,” Sky Sports F1’s executive producer Martin Turner said.

BBC F1

Although not explicitly stated, it appears the BBC F1 team will also remain as 2014 for the upcoming season. With coverage fronted by Suzi Perry, Eddie Jordan and David Coulthard, analysis will come from Allan McNish and pit-lane reporting from Lee McKenzie. Commentary will once again be provided by Ben Edwards and Coulthard for the TV feed, while James Allen will commentate on races for BBC Radio 5 Live joined by McNish. Jennie Gow will feature on the radio coverage as a pit-lane reporter.

There will be comprehensive coverage of the whole season across television, radio and online. All races will be live on BBC Radio 5 Live or 5 Live Sports extra and fans can also follow all the action and the latest news on the F1 section of the BBC Sport website and via the BBC Sport App. World Champion Lewis Hamilton will continue to write his column for the BBC website.

A new addition to the BBC F1 coverage this year is Formula 1 Rewind which will be presented by Suzi Perry. Murray Walker will be recounting classic Grand Prix from the past.

“Like all F1 fans, we can’t wait for the 2015 season,” Ben Gallop, the BBC’s Head of F1, said. “With Lewis Hamilton as World Champion, F1 in Britain is in a great position and we’re delighted with our race package. These live races, combined with our ever-popular highlights programmes and our extensive coverage on radio and online means F1 fans can follow every step of Hamilton’s title defence on the BBC”.

The BBC negotiates with fellow broadcaster Sky on the division of live and non-live races, with a variety of factors being taken into account when deciding the picks. For the races not shown live on BBC TV audiences are offered a wealth of ways to follow the action with extended TV highlights and live radio and online coverage.

The BBC has a deal to broadcast Formula 1 racing, through to and including 2018.

2015 Formula One Calendar Confirmed

The World Motor Sport Council have met in Beijing and have confirmed the 2015 Formula One World Championship Calendar.

The calendar will feature 20 races starting in March in Australia and finishing in Abu Dhabi at the end of November:

Round 1 – Australian Grand Prix – 13th – 15th March 2015
Round 2 – Malaysian Grand Prix – 27th – 29th March 2015
Round 3 – Bahrain Grand Prix – 3rd – 5th April 2015
Round 4 – Chinese Grand Prix – 17th – 19th April 2015
Round 5 – Spanish Grand Prix – 8th – 10th May 2015
Round 6 – Monaco Grand Prix – 22nd – 24th May 2015
Round 7 – Canadian Grand Prix – 5th – 7th June 2015
Round 8 – Austrian Grand Prix – 19th – 21st June 2015
Round 9 – British Grand Prix – 3rd – 5th July 2015
Round 10 – German Grand Prix – 17th – 19th July 2015
Round 11 – Hungarian Grand Prix – 24th – 26th July 2015
Round 12 – Belgian Grand Prix – 21st – 23rd August 2015
Round 13 – Italian Grand Prix – 4th – 6th September 2015
Round 14 – Singapore Grand Prix – 18th – 20th September 2015
Round 15 – Japanese Grand Prix – 25th – 27th September 2015
Round 16 – Russian Grand Prix – 9th – 11th October 2015
Round 17 – US Grand Prix – 23rd – 25th October 2015
Round 18 – Mexican Grand Prix – 30th October – 1st November 2015
Round 19 – Brazilian Grand Prix – 13th – 15th November 2015
Round 20 – Abu Dhabi Grand Prix – 27th – 29th November 2015

The calendar is similar to 2014 with the addition of the Mexican Grand Prix bringing the number of races to 20. The US Grand Prix has moved a week earlier and will go back-to-back with Mexico. There will be four back-to-back races in total.

McLaren ’50 in 50′: Gerhard Berger

Austrian driver Gerhard Berger came from a background of racing for ATS, Arrows, Benetton and most notably Ferrari before he joined McLaren. He was already a multiple race winner when he joined McLaren in 1990, replacing a departing Alain Prost and partnering Ayrton Senna.

Berger raced in F3 and touring cars before making his Formula One debut in 1984 at his home grand prix, driving for German team ATS. He finished sixth in Italy which should have been his first points in F1 but he did not receive it due to not being officially registered. The following year he moved to Arrows scoring points at the last two races of the season. In 1986 it was another team for Berger, this time piloting the Benetton to seventh in the championship. He picked up his first podium in San Marino, where he finished third. Later that year he won the Mexican Grand Prix, making good use of his Pirelli tyres meaning to beat Alain Prost by 25 seconds.

Berger was signed up by Ferrari in a three year deal starting in 1987. He partnered Michele Alboreto in 1987 and 1988 and was joined by Nigel Mansell in 1989. During his time with Ferrari, Berger took four wins and seven further podiums. In 1988 he was the only non-McLaren driver to win a race, a popular win at the Italian squad’s home race. Consistent scoring and podium finishes saw him finish third in the championship although with less than half the points of Prost in second. It was a disappointing season in 1989 with reliability problems and accidents led to him finishing only three races. All three were podium positions including a win in Portugal.

Following Prost’s departure, Berger was signed up to McLaren for 1990. His first race weekend started well after securing pole position for the US Grand Prix. It didn’t end successfully, however, after he crashed and then later retired with clutch problems. The next handful of races yielded four podiums from five races. He ended the year in fourth place in the championship, tied on points with Nelson Piquet. Berger’s team-mate Senna won the championship. He replicated the result in 1991 – fourth in the championship with 43 points. Again Senna won the championship. In 1992 he scored more points – 49 to be precise – but dropped to fifth in the championship. In total, over the course of three years, Berger accumulated 18 podiums and three wins. He announced before the end of the 1992 season that he would be leaving the team to return to Ferrari.

Berger is known for his friendship with Senna, which developed during their time as team-mates. The pair were known for playing practical jokes on each other. Following his retirement from Formula One in 1997, he still remained in the sport. He was the first driver to drive on the Shanghai International Circuit in 2003, behind the wheel of a Ferrari. He also owned a 50% stake of Toro Rosso between 2006 and 2008 before selling his share back to Dietrich Mateschitz. He is currently President of the FIA Single Seat Commission.